Chris Villemarette, Trial Lawyer ChrisVillemarette Trial Lawyers
Toll Free: 866-574-4740 | Local: 337-205-7593
Toll Free: 866-574-4740 |
Local: 337-205-7593

Congressional candidate faces sudden need for criminal defense

Louisiana voters probably feel as if candidates seeking election are a special group of people with an outstanding personal record. The truth is, most candidates are just regular people and face many of the same troubles as persons in other career fields. Recently, a man running for the U.S. Congress was shocked to find out that he had been accused of a serious crime, for which there was an outstanding warrant. He quickly realized he would need to make arrangements to present a criminal defense, before the accusations potentially affected the results of the upcoming election. 

The man was interested in running for political office, and filed all his paperwork to do so. Likely excited to begin his campaign, he probably never thought he would be hauled out of the  Louisiana secretary of state's office in handcuffs. After taking care of the paperwork necessary to run for public office, police arrived and informed him that he had an outstanding warrant for his arrest. 

The man stands accused of impersonating a police officer, yet investigators have not released any details of the accusation. It was noted that the man protested as officers led him, handcuffed, out of the office. The charges are still pending at this time, and it is unknown what evidence, if any, will be brought about to support the charges. 

Anyone accused of a crime may feel inadequate to present a solid criminal defense. In many cases, it can be helpful to seek the assistance of an experienced attorney. An attorney can explain that being charged with a crime is certainly no proof of guilt, and help the accused person gather evidence to defend against the formal accusations in court. 

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